Scribblenauts Remix for iPhone and iPad!

Two years ago on September 15, 2009, a company called 5th Cell released a puzzle game for the Nintendo DS, while puzzle games aren’t a new thing to the Nintendo handheld, this one stood apart from the crowd due to it’s unique gameplay mechanic. The game is a 2d side scroller, where you control a boy names “Maxwell” who can summon objects from his notepad. Summoning objects on the DS was a simple matter of typing out the object you wanted on the lower screen and it would appear in the game world. The game boasted an enormous vocabulary of things that could be summoned, and everything that was summoned could be interacted with; for example, summoning a Helicopter would allow Maxwell to fly. The open nature of this game mechanic allowed for a variety of fun and creative ways to solve the games 220 puzzles. To round out the experience, the game also boasts a very cute art style and it a very catchy soundtrack. 

Yesterday, 5th Cell, released their IOS version, which is universal for both iPad and iPhone (Hurray!). It sports some of the new IOS5 cloud features, which makes it’s way to IOS devices today. For example, save games are now exchangeable between devices. However, the game doesn’t have as many levels as the Nintendo version (I think it has 50), and the notebook is a separate screen which sort of takes you away from the game to summon an object, but all the gameplay elements are still present. Overall this is a fun and enjoyable game on the iPhone and iPad, If you’ve never played Scribblenauts before, or even if you have, this is a nice game to add to your IOS library. The game is currently selling for $4.99, which is about $10 cheaper than the Nintendo DS version. 

Scribblenauts Remix - Warner Bros.

      

My God it’s Full of Games! Humble Bundle and Final Fantasy Tactics

This week is quite a week for games. The folks over at the Humble Bundle are running their charity event again, Humble Bundle #3. If you don’t know what that is, its basically a charity event that raises money for the Electronic Frontier Foundation and Child’s Play, at the same time it offers exposure to independent game developers and a chance for them to make a few dollars too. This Humble Bundle includes the following games: Crayon Physics Deluxe, Cogs, VVVVVV, Hammerfight, And Yet It Moves, and Steel Storm. You also get a promo to play Minecraft until August 14. As an additional bonus, anyone paying above a certain minimum (currently $5.20) can also get the games in the previous Humble Bundle, which includes, Braid, Cortex Command, Machinarium, Osmos, and Revenge of the Titans. All told, that’s 11 game, not counting the time limited Minecraft promo, quite a deal indeed!

Today also marks Square Enix’s release of Final Fantasy Tactics for the iPhone, for $15.99. The price seems steep in comparison to other games on the Apple App Store, but this is a port of the latest Playstation Portable (PSP) version, and at half the price of the PSP version! For those unfamiliar with the series, Final Fantasy Tactics is a turn-based strategy game that’s been around since the Playstation One days and set the standard for just about all turn based strategy games that have come out since. Square-Enix has also made a very strong showing on the Apple platform, by making quality ports of their Final Fantasy games, and even a new game series called “Chaos Rings”. So Final Fantasy Tactics should be pretty darn good. My only reservation is Square-Enix has the habit of releasing separate iPhone and iPad versions, instead of a universal version, which means I will need to buy the iPad version separately when it comes out later this fall, and I don’t relish the idea of buy the game twice… Even with this in mind, I’ll probably still pick this up.

FINAL FANTASY TACTICS: THE WAR OF THE LIONS - SQUARE ENIX Co., LTD.

Review: Doctor Wunda’s Recyclatron for iPad

Matching Puzzle games are nothing new to Apple’s App Store, but Doctor Wunda’s Recyclatron by 3Squared adds a new twist to the equation. The best way I can describe the game is you are on an assembly line sorting out several objects into one of four alternately scrolling conveyor belts for Dr. Wunda; who appears to be a zany German scientist. The conveyors show shadows of the objects you are to match up, each conveyor also moves at a slightly different speed. As you successfully match shapes you increase your score, build up bonuses, and garner praise from the good doctor. Not all the objects that appear match something on the conveyor, so you need to make a choice to discard the objects and incur a point deduction. Once all shapes are matched up, you complete the level and move onto increasingly harder conveyors. Each set of levels are also grouped by material type, and each silhouette becomes more tricky to match. Throughout your sorting tasks is a whacky repetitive song that seems well suited for the game, but it does become a bit grating after a while. Mercifully, there’s an option to turn the music off; although doing so seems to diminish the game a bit.

The game could use some additions, like maybe a timer or clock to beat to add additional challenge to the game, but all in all, it’s a fun game for all ages, and 3Squared is planning on releasing additional levels sometime in the future.

Doctor Wunda’s Recyclatron - 3Squared Ltd.

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SpeedBall 2 Evolution – Relive an Amiga Classic on the iPhone

If you were around during the Commodore Amiga days you might remember a popular sci-fi sports game called Speedball. It was a mix of Rugby and Football in a futuristic setting. The players were all clad in armor and the field was even metal. It was a fast paced game with two teams pitted against each other to try and score at each other’s goal at the opposite end of the arena. It’s not a revolutionary concept, but Speedball’s execution was well done. I’m not a big sports fan, I don’t watch football or rugby for that matter. But something about this game was plain fun. It might have been the futuristic metal setting, but the original Speedball sits in a fond place in my memory.

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